MyPropertyPowerTeam
Find your next rated tradesperson
Find a Tenant The Business Pages for Property Investment Current and archived property articles Join in our Property Investment and Landlords Forum and have your say! return to my property power team home page Services for Landlords Buy to Let mortgages and legals Find your next investment Prosper with Property Education Property Investment networking opportunities
Article > Top 10 Tips For Buying Overseas Property



Article kindly supplied by

Dave Lawrence
Professional Property Investor


Buying a property in another country can be both a rewarding and an exciting prospect for many property investors who have always dreamed of owning their own piece of their favourite holiday destination, but investors are warned not to let their hearts rule their heads. It’s crucial to seek the right advice and try not to cut corners. The principles that property investor should stick to in the UK also apply when purchasing overseas property.

Below are a few tips to ensure that purchasing an overseas property is as hassle-free as possible.

1. Contracts
Never sign a contract that you don’t understand. If two versions are provided, i.e. English and local language, ask your solicitor to confirm the English version is a true translation, as you need to ensure it doesn’t contain errors, omissions or extras.
Always read the contract. Ensure you are fully conversant with the terms and conditions you are about to agree to.
Specific points to be clear about include:
• What deposit is required? Is it refundable and under what circumstances?
• For new properties, what stage payments are required and when?
• What is included in the price and what is the cost of the extras?
• Check the due completion date.

2. Obtain an Approval in Principle
If you require mortgage finance, obtain an ‘Agreement in Principle’ for the mortgage before agreeing to purchase the property, or before signing any contracts and paying a deposit. This will tell you exactly how much you can borrow and the price range you can realistically consider.
It will put you in a much better position with agents and developers, proving to them that that you’re a serious buyer, and you’ll be better placed to negotiate price. It’s tangible evidence that you can take along when house hunting and it can also lead to your application being fast tracked once you’ve chosen your property.

3. Valuation
Before proceeding with the purchase (especially with a re-sale property, regardless of age), ensure an independent valuation of the property is carried out, which should point out any problems with the property – e.g. subsidence, damp, wiring defects - and could also highlight any possible boundary disputes.

4. Legal advice
Seek specialist counsel from an independent English-speaking solicitor who is not connected to your seller, estate agent or developer. If required, you can also consult valuers, surveyors or architects. They should be proficient in your chosen country’s laws and processes and also know the specifics involved in buying a property there.
It’s essential that they confirm to you that all required permissions, licences and planning consents have been obtained. In particular, your lawyer should check that you’re buying a property with the correct title. And that you are being registered as the official owner.
One of the biggest advantages of taking out an overseas mortgage is that the lender will do its own checks on the property, ensuring that a proper legal title exists, that the property is registered in the buyer’s name and that a valuation of the property takes place.

5. New build properties
If buying from a developer
• What’s their track record?
• How long have they been trading?
• Are references available from previous buyers?
Check comparable properties in the area and any re-sales offered on the same development.
If the developer mentions ‘rental returns’, what are these based on? Check they’re feasible and have been achieved in the past.
Before making any commitment to purchase, allow for a cooling off period, just in case you see a must-have property and are tempted to put down an instant deposit.

6. Research
Conduct thorough due diligence and research on local facilities and transport links. People gravitate to locations with a nearby airport, (especially if it’s served by a budget airline), but remember there are no guarantees that cheap flights will continue indefinitely to any one location. Proximity to basic facilities like restaurants, shops and a beach are also important.


Talk to people who already live or own property in your chosen area, to get a better understanding of what it’s like to live there. Also consider the property off-season, many resorts are seasonal and virtually close when the tourists return home.

7. Exchange rate fluctuations
Even small changes in exchange rates can make a big difference to
• The purchase price of your property overseas
• Monthly mortgage payments
• Future rental income.
Consider the benefits of financing your property with a mortgage secured in the local currency – e.g. if you’re planning to rent out a European property through agents local to the property, the euro income can be used to service the monthly euro mortgage payments, avoiding any fluctuations in currency.

8. Local money
Open a bank account in your chosen country and, where relevant, ensure you obtain a Certificate of Importation for the money you bring in from your home country.
Set up standing orders in your local bank account to meet local bills and taxes. Failure to pay your taxes in some European countries such as France, Portugal and Spain, could lead to legal action by the Government authorities.

9. Tax
Check the inheritance and capital gains tax laws of the country where you are buying. For example, in France your children automatically inherit rights to your house; your estate may not automatically pass to your spouse and you may, therefore, need to compile a separate will.
If you take a mortgage out on a property in France or Spain, it may reduce your inheritance tax liability as there is a debt on the property. If you rent out your property you will be liable for income tax.
Seek professional tax advice so that you’re fully compliant and to take advantage of all the possible deductions.

10. Extras
Bear in mind that bills don’t end at the asking price. solicitor's fees, local and national taxes, insurance, etc must all be met in the host country and can often add at least a further 10% to the cost of acquisition. Ensure you are aware of the costs charged by the legal and Government authorities for purchasing a property in your chosen country.


 

About the Author

Dave has been an active property investor since 1999. His buy to let portfolio contains a mixture of property types and he also invests in buy to flip reposessions.

 

 

 

Bookmark and Share

 

Back to Top

 

FEATURED SUPPLIERS
Property Investing Quick Start

Get Insurance quotes at QuoteSmasher.co.uk

Free Report - No Money Down Property Investment Strategy
 
The best BTL insurance.  Simple
Advertise Here!
 
© 2018 My Property Power Team | privacy policy | terms & conditions | contact us | advertise |